Visit Nottinghamshire


Home of legendary outlaw Robin Hood, dynamic culture, rich history and sporting glory - Nottinghamshire is one of the UK's top destinations, and a warm welcome always awaits.  

Whether you visit Nottinghamshire for a weekend break or a day out with the kids at top attractions, you can see world class sport, amazing live performancesexcellent nightlife and cutting-edge art in outstanding venues.

Taste fine dining at Michelin star restaurantsshop at high street favourites and unique independents, and enjoy local produce in traditional market towns.

Rousing stories of rebellion and virtue are written into our DNA - visit the enchanting Sherwood Forest to walk in the footsteps of Robin Hood, learn of castles torn apart by civil war, or enjoy a cocktail in one of the city’s cave bars. You can even trace the daring footsteps of Pilgrims from Nottinghamshire to the Americas, before learning how Nottinghamshire innovations like MRI scanners have helped change the world for the better.


Sherwood Forest

Once an area of woodland and heathland stretching over 30 miles from Nottingham to Worksop, Sherwood Forest was established as a royal hunting preserve in the 10th Century.

Made legendary as the home of the famous outlaw in the ballads of Robin Hood, amongst the great oaks you will find the timeworn beauty, The Major Oak, along with nature trails and walks.

Today you can visit the sites of Clumber and Thoresby and see grand houses and country park estates. On the Welbeck Estate you will find the Harley Gallery and the Welbeck Farm Shop along with the School of Artisan Food.

Over time, Sherwood Forest has become fragmented as settlements developed and the rich wood resources found here were used for building materials. You can now find a cluster of main country parks that offer an insight into how this mighty forest may have once appeared - Rufford AbbeySSherwood Forest National Nature Reserve and Sherwood Pines Forest Park to name but a few. These spots are all great for picnics, walks and outdoor activities such as Go Ape.

Wollaton Hall

Set in the beautiful suburbs of Nottingham, this spectacular Elizabethan Mansion and Deer Park was designed by Robert Smythson and built by Sir Francis Willoughby between 1580 and 1588 for his family. Now a prominent Grade One listed building, the stunning Hall houses the city's Natural History Museum along with reconstructed room settings.

Standing on a natural hill three miles west of Nottingham city centre, Wollaton Hall is set in 500 acres of spectacular gardens and parkland. The hall was used as the setting for Wayne Manor in the 2012 Batman film, Dark Knight Rises.

On site, in addition to the historic hall and its sumptuous grounds, visitors will find Nottingham's Natural History Museum, Nottingham's Industrial Museum (open the last Sunday of each month for Sunday Steamings) and The Park Deli situated in the Courtyard Buildings under the Clock Tower, open weekends and school holidays 10am – 4.30pm).

Newstead Abbey

A beautiful historic house set in a glorious landscape of gardens and parkland within the heart of Nottinghamshire. Founded as a monastic house in the late 12th century, Newstead was home to the poet Lord Byron between 1808 - 1814. Inside the Abbey there is much to explore including Victorian room settings, and the poets private apartments.

The gardens and parkland at Newstead Abbey cover more than 300 acres with paths that meander past lakes, ponds and waterfalls. The formal gardens are the perfect place to relax and offer something in all seasons from the bright colours of the rhododendrons in late spring to the Japanese maples in autumn.

The Abbey hosts a variety of special events and temporary exhibitions throughout the year.

Southwell Minster

Southwell Minster, the Cathedral of Nottinghamshire, is rich historical and architectural interest. It provides fine examples of the main styles of architecture, particularly Norman and early English. The latter is very evident in the 13th century Chapter House, one of the Minsters most glorious features with some of the finest examples of naturalistic carvings in the country - the Leaves of Southwell.

The Minster has a strong musical tradition with Evensong sung during term time by the Cathedral Choir and orchestral with choral concerts held throughout the year. Other events such as the Bramley Festival of Food and Drink and a Craft Fair as well as theatrical productions and art exhibitions are held in the beautiful Nave.

The Visitors Centre incorporates the Cathedral Shop, Refectory and audio visual centre. A digitally-recorded audio guide is available.

Newark Castle

Newark Castle and Gardens are lovely, formal gardens bordered by the remaining walls of Newark Castle, which was partly destroyed in 1646 at the end of the English Civil War. The Castle has stood proudly on the banks of the River Trent for nearly 900 years.

Guided tours of the Castle are conducted by the Castle Ranger every week.

Surfaced pathways in the castle and gardens allow suitable access for wheelchairs. During the visit, relax in the quiet garden areas and admire the picturesque views. Entertainment often occurs seasonally, with a bandstand for concerts available, and makes for a great day out.

Newark Castle and Gardens offer nearby parking, so it is easily accessible by car. It is also close to historic market places; Southwell market and Newark market, so why not visit the pretty market towns too.

 


For more ideas and inspiration for your visit to Nottinghamshire, visit visit-nottinghamshire.co.uk